Peace, War, and Christians

English Service on August 16, 2015   Messenger: Pastor Jim Allison

Title:“Peace, War, and Christians  Scripture: Romans 12:14-21


As we move once again through August, especially in this 70-year anniversary of the end of World War II, the thoughts of many people turn to peace and how we can have it.  You may have noticed that at Open Door we have very few messages focused on particular moral or political issues.  I do not think of myself as a very political person.  I did not come to Japan for political reasons.  As a pastor, I believe it is part of my job to understand and support a wide variety of people with many different understandings and opinions.  It is important to me that Open Door be a place where people with many differing views on moral or political matters can come together and learn about God in an atmosphere of openness and acceptance, with no one feeling threatened or unwelcome.


Also, Open Door has never been the kind of church where the pastor tells the members what to think and they all say, “OK.  You are God’s spokesperson, so we believe everything you say.”  That’s not what I want.  Especially as a pastor of a Protestant church, I want you to learn to listen to God and hear His voice speaking to you.  I want you to learn to sense His hand guiding you and obey as He leads you.  Of course, you need a community to do that best.  We need to learn from each other and together from God.  But if in that process, you don’t agree with me or someone else here, it doesn’t mean anything bad.  It is just a sign that at least one of us doesn’t have all the answers yet.  That’s not news, is it.  We all need to keep humbly learning.


With that in mind, today I am going to take on the difficult topic of war and peace.  (Don’t worry, this talk is not going to be as long as the book, War and Peace.)  It is one of those things about which many people feel very strongly.  Especially living in the only nation which has experienced an atomic bomb attack, with fears of what could happen in the future to lead us again into war, we face the question of how to understand war and peace.  


I want to approach that with you today by asking three questions and finding what God says in the Bible related to them.  First, how does God feel about war and peace?  Second, is war ever necessary?  Third, how can we find the path to peace?  


Before we start, though, I have to warn you.  These are difficult questions, partly because God’s word does not spell out the answers to them very clearly.  It never says, for example, “You must never go to war” or “War is OK as a way to solve problems.”  So even after we hear God’s teachings, we are likely to understand and receive them differently, then come out with different answers about what is good and bad.  But that does not mean God’s teachings do not have great value.  They may not be completely clear to us, but in His wisdom, He chooses to give just this much to us, then lead us to deeper understanding as we follow Him, trusting Him to guide us into deeper knowledge as we go.  


First, how does God feel about war and peace?  This much is clear.  Because we are all created in God's image, each human life is of great, great value.  So Jesus tells us in Matthew 5:9, “Blessed are those who make peace.  They will be called sons of God.”  Then in vv. 38-39 of the same chapter, He says, 


You have heard that is was said, “An eye must be put out for an eye.  A tooth must be knocked out for a tooth.”  But here is what I tell you.  Do not fight against an evil person.  Suppose someone hits you on your right cheek. Turn your other cheek to him also.   


Today’s Bible reading has a kind of summary of the way God wants us to act toward other people.  Romans 12:18 says, “If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone.”  This is God’s desire.  


One day He approached Jerusalem (Luke 19:41b-42).  “When he saw the city, he began to sob.  He said, ‘I wish you had known today what would bring you peace!  But now it is hidden from your eyes.’”  In other words, when we humans do not live in peace, it breaks God’s heart.  He would rather die than see us at war with Him and each other.  


So if God feels this deeply about peace, as His people, we must never take part in war, right?  That may seem like the only possible answer.  Christian pacifists around the world have believed this for centuries.  Yet as other Christians have looked at the Bible and at the hard realities of life in this world, they have come out with different answers.  Many separate between offensive and defensive wars, for example.  Today, more Christians believe that wars are necessary in certain cases than those who say it is always better to avoid war.  Augustine of Hippo, the philosopher of the fourth and fifth centuries, wrote about “just war.”  In the years since then, many others have built on his ideas.  Here is an overview of these ideas.


1. The cause of initiating war must be just. That is, it cannot be for aggressive purposes but rather for the defense and protection of the innocent.

2. War cannot be initiated justly except by those who hold the proper authority and responsibility. While turning the other cheek in Matthew 5 speaks to specifically to interpersonal relationships, Romans 13 tells us that God has ordained governments and her agents as His ministers to bring wrath on those who practice evil. For war to be just it can only be declared by a competent authority.

3. The moral merit on our side must clearly outweigh the moral merit on the other side. While both sides may claim that God is on their side, for war to be just, we must clearly be able to demonstrate that ours is a more just cause.

4. War can only be declared with the right intention, which is to obtain or restore a just peace. The desires to punish or humiliate are not justifiable intentions.

5. War must be the last resort. All non-violent alternatives for peace must be exhausted before resorting to war.

6. War cannot be justified if the prospect of success is hopeless, regardless of how just the cause may be. If it cannot be won, to fight it would be an unnecessary expenditure of life.

7. War should be seen as a tragic necessity, not an opportunity for aggression. Driven by the principle of love, we should never enter war eagerly but reluctantly and only out of necessity.

     

As an example of the ideas of “just war,” the Oxford and Cambridge academic and Christian writer C. S. Lewis asked readers to think of this situation.  A crazed man comes by and knocks him down on his way to finding another person he wants to kill.  Seeing this, does our Lord really want Lewis to stand by and let this man kill his victim?  Lewis’ clear answer is “No.”

Christians who see war as sometimes necessary look, for another example, back to the last century and Adolf Hitler.  Would peace with Nazi Germany have been possible?  Hitler pretended to want peace but then invaded Poland and other countries.  And today how realistic is it to face the problem of ISIS and similar groups with the promise that we will never use physical force?  For people who see “just war” as sometimes required, this is what the Bible means when it says in Ecclesiastes 3, “There is a time for war.  And there’s a time for peace.”

But just as many see problems with pacifism, others have disagreed with “just war” principles.  For one thing, about points one and three, who gets to decide if the cause for going to war is a just cause or not?  Many, if not most or all people who go to war think they are right.  From Christians who fought in the Crusades to radical Muslim jihadists to many others, people who start wars very often think they are doing a good or necessary thing when there is no basis for it in the teachings or leading of God.  It is very easy to deceive others, or even ourselves, into thinking we are in the right when we are not.

As I may have told you before, I have some personal feelings about this point.  I grew up thinking that my country would very possibly send me to fight in the Vietnam War, as many other young men were being sent.  Some were refusing to go, but others were going.  I thought differently then, and I probably would have gone.  I might have killed people or been killed.  Gladly, the war ended when I was 15.  So it was shocking to me to read 20 years later that the U.S. Secretary of Defense during the war, Robert McNamara, had written in a book, “We were wrong, terribly wrong” (p. 1) to have stayed in Vietnam as long as we did.  The war that seemed so just and so necessary to so many people in the beginning did not look that way later.  There are other similar examples.  

And point four says that the motivation for war must be “to obtain or restore a just peace.”  But many of the most horrible things done in wars are done “to hasten the end of the war.”  The atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki were meant especially to speed the end of the war by being so shocking and terrible that the will of the Japanese people to fight would be gone.  But looking at what happened, many of us find it extremely difficult to call the motive for these acts “just” or “peace-seeking.”

Few if any Christians see war as a good thing, but many see pacifism as so naïve that it is a deadly belief system which will lead to more and not less war.  In the real world, where there are people who will kill others whenever the opportunity is there, respect for human life requires the willingness to use violence to protect it.  In the view of many Christians, pacifism fails to keep the peace that it seeks.  It does too little to resist evil, and innocent people often end up suffering the consequences.     


So where is the path of peace?  If on one hand God hates war and killing people is evil, but on the other hand pacifism to many seems so naïve, how can we find a more Christian response to the question of war and peace?  How can we go about accomplishing our mission of never desiring war but always seeking peace, so far as it depends upon us?


Some people point out that the ideas of “just war” have led not to more war but steps toward more peace.  For example, many people in Europe and other places believed for many years that only nations’ leaders were responsible for decisions of going to war.  Leaders were responsible to God, but ordinary people were only responsible to obey the leaders.  But the demand of “just war” theory for a clear explanation of why war is necessary has led more ordinary people to question the need for war and work against beginning wars.  The Nuremburg Trials of German leaders after World War II were an important step toward shifting responsibility to ordinary soldiers, not only leaders, and “just war” principles were a great part of this process.  


In various other real-life cases, the ideas behind “just war” teachings have made it easier for people to oppose war.  Saying that (1) the threat to innocent people is not great enough or (2) or all the other options have not been tried yet or (3) the chance for winning is not great enough has made possible stronger arguments through the “just war” theory.  


But after all is said, the path to peace according to Christian faith lies in the gospel.  And I am not talking only about the forgiveness of our sin.  The whole gospel changes all parts of our lives.  It is a lifestyle and an attitude and a spirit, not only some teaching points.  So let’s look at the gospel of peace once more.  


From the very beginning of the world, God has wanted peace, first and most between people and Himself.  When human sin came, it broke that peace, and it brought broken human relationships that soon were leading to murder and then war.  Yet God did not give up on people.  Because of His deep love for us, time and again He sent leaders who loved peace, teachings that commanded peace, and actions that showed His peace.  


When we humans refused to let even those gifts be enough to lead us to peace, He sent His own Son to our world.  He came to show us what living in peace looks like.  He did not take up a sword and act like the other leaders, showing greatness through military or political or economic power.  Neither was He weak.  He showed an entirely different type of power.  He presented Himself as the king of a whole different type of kingdom.  The kingdom of God was and is spiritual in nature, far more than anything else.  


The Bible presents Jesus telling people words designed to turn them away from world of war where might makes right and everything is about winning or losing.  He worked instead to build a community of peace-loving people (Matthew 5:44-45).   


I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be children of your Father in heaven: for he makes his son rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the righteous and on the unrighteous. 


I said earlier that God would rather die than live in broken relationship to us.  In fact, that’s just what Jesus did.  He died on the cross to pay the price of our sin and make a way for us to enter into peace again with God and with each other.  Throughout the whole Bible story, even at the end of time, God’s deep concern is peace.  In the great vision of the Revelation of John, at the end of this world, God brings together His people from every nation, tribe, and tongue to live forever with Him in His home in peace.   

  

So there it is.  That is not a magic answer with all the pieces of the peace and war puzzle fitting nicely together.  But it is a pattern for living that Christ calls you and me to follow.  He asks us to imitate Him in finding ways to be bridge-builders and not wall-builders.  He expects His people to find unique ways in our world today to “seek peace and pursue it” (Psalm 34:14, NIV).  He wants us to learn to show the spirit He did on the cross, in standing against the forces that lead people to war today and giving ourselves so that His vision of a world at peace can become a reality. 


We praise God for His promise that one day Christ will return to restore the world to the order and peace it had in the beginning, when God created it.  At that time people will finally be at peace with Him and as a result with each other.  Yet we are called not only to look forward to that day but also to work for peace here and now in this world.  So until the Christ of peace returns, let us pray, let us work, and let us be strong in Him, so that all people, everywhere, will have the opportunity to know the Christ of peace and thus the peace of Christ.


Let’s pray.  


God, you teach your people everywhere that we are accountable to you first, most, and last—far more than to any human or government or culture.  So help us to not to give in to the pressures from forces in this world that push us away from peace and toward living in division, conflict, and even war.  You sent your Son to reign as the Prince of Peace.  Let Him reign in our hearts and minds and all of your world.  We pray it in His name, amen. 

   




Sources


Grimsrud, T. (n.d.) “Peace Theology: A Christian Pacifist Perspective on War and Peace.” Retrieved August 11, 2015 from http://peacetheology.net/pacifism/2-a-christian-pacifist-perspective

-on-war-and-peace/

Lewis, C. S. (1941). “Why I’m Not a Pacifist.” The Weight of Glory. San Francisco: HarperOne.

McNamara, R. (1996). In Retrospect: The Tragedy and Lessons of Vietnam. 1st Edition. New York: Vintage Books.

Moore, T. C. (n.d.) “Why C. S. Lewis Was Wrong About Pacifism.” TanksToTractors.org. Retrieved August 11, 2015 from   http://www.academia.edu/410218/Why_C._S._Lewis_Was_Wrong _About_Pacifism

Southern Baptist Convention, The. (2000). The Baptist Faith and Message. Retrieved August 11, 2015 from http://www.sbc.net/bfm2000/ bfm2000.asp

Wittman, C. (May 09, 2009). “Peace and War.” Baptist Faith and Message Sermon 18. Retrieved August 10, 2015 from http://www.lifeway. com/Article/Foundations-faith-peace-and-war





ローマの信徒への手紙12:14〜21


“クリスチャンにとっての平和と戦争”


 8月を迎えるこの時期、多くの人々が平和に目を向け考えます。第二次世界大戦終戦から70年という大きな節目を迎える今年は特にそうでしょう。皆さんがご存知の通り、オープン・ドア・チャペルでは特定の道徳観念や政治問題について話すことは滅多にありません。私自身、政治的な人ではありませんし、政治目的で日本へ来ていません。異なる見解を持つ様々な人々を理解し、支援するのが牧師としての私の仕事の一つだと信じています。道徳や政治問題に関して違う意見を持つ人々がお互いを理解し合い、気持ちよく意見交換ができる開放かつ受容的な環境で神様のことを学ぶ、オープン・ドア・チャペルがこのような場所であることが重要だと思っています。


 オープン・ドア・チャペルは牧師が何を考えるべきか教え、教会メンバーが「牧師は神様の代弁者です。あなたが言うことを全て信じます」と答えるような教会ではありません。私はこのような教会を望んではいません。特に私はプロテスタントの牧師として、皆さんに神様へ耳を傾け、主の御声を聞いて欲しいのです。私たちを導いてくださる主の御手を感じ、委ね仕えて欲しいのです。そのためにはコミュニティーが必要です。私たちはお互いを理解し、共に神様を学ぶ必要があります。そういった過程の中で、賛同できない人がいるかもしれませんが、それは問題ではありません。少なくとも私たちの一人が全てを理解していないサインだということです。それらに驚かず、私たちは謙虚に学びを続けなければいけません。


 これらを念頭に置き、今日、私は難しいテーマである戦争と平和について話したいと思います(小説の『戦争と平和』のように長い話にはなりませんので、どうぞ心配しないでくだい)。戦争と平和は、人々が強く関心をよせるテーマの一つでしょう。特に原爆を受けた唯一の国家である日本に住み、将来何かによって再び戦争が起こるかもしれないという恐怖を持ちながら、私たちは戦争と平和への理解へ取り組んでいるのです。


 ここで私は皆さんに3つの質問をしてみたいと思います。そして、戦争と平和に関して神様が聖書の中でどのように答えているのかを見つけましょう。第一に神様は戦争と平和についてどう思われているのか?第二に戦争は必要なのか?第三に私たちはどのように平和への道を見つけることができるのか?


 この質問を考える前に忠告しておきます。御言葉においても神様は部分的にしか明確には答えていません。だからこそ難問なのです。例えば、「戦争には決して行くべきではない」、「戦争は問題解決の方法としては正しい」などとは決して言っていません。私たちは神様の教えを聞いた後でさえ、間違って理解してしまうかもしれません。善悪に関しても異なった答えを出しかねないのです。しかし、それは神の教えが大きな価値を持たないことを意味するのではありません。神の教えが明確ではなくても、主の知恵により、主は私たちが理解できる限りのことを与えてくださいます。私たちが主へ従うことにより深い理解へ導いてくださいます。そして、共に歩むことにより、主が私たちを深い知識へ導いてくださると私たちは信じています。


 始めに、神様は戦争と平和についてどう考えておられるのでしょう?答えは明確です。私たちは神様のかたちに造られました。人間は重要であり、重要な価値があります。イエス様はマタイによる福音書5:9でこのように述べています。「平和を実現する人々は、幸いである、/その人たちは神の子と呼ばれる」。同じ章の38〜39節は次のように語っています。

 

 あなたがたも聞いているとおり、『目には目を、歯には歯を』と命 じられている。しかし、わたしは言っておく。悪人に手向かっては ならない。だれかがあなたの右の頬を打つなら、左の頬をも向けな さい。


 今日、私たちが読む聖書の箇所は、私たちの他人に対する行為に関して神様が求められる要約のひとつです。ローマの信徒への手紙12:18にこう書かれています。「できれば、せめてあなたがたは、すべての人と平和に暮らしなさい。」これは神様の要求です。


 ある日、イエス様はエルサレムへと近づきました(ルカによる福音書19:41-42)。「エルサレムに近づき、都が見えたとき、イエスはその都のために泣いて、言われた。『もしこの日に、お前も平和への道をわきまえていたなら……。しかし今は、それがお前には見えない。』」他の言葉に言い換えるのなら、私たち人間が平和に暮らさないとき、神様の心を悲しませます。戦争している私たちの姿を見るよりも、神様は死ぬ方がよいと考えられます。


 神様がこのように深く平和に対して望まれるのならば、主に仕える私たちは決して戦争に参加してはいけないでしょう。それが唯一の可能な答えであるように思えます。何世紀もの間、クリスチャンの平和主義者たちはそのように信じてきました。しかし、この難しい現実で他のクリスチャンが聖書から見出したことは異なる答えでした。例えば、多くの人々は攻撃を否定しますが、防御戦を認める場合があります。今日において、戦争は常に避けるべきだという人よりも、多くのクリスチャンが特定のケースにおいて戦争は必要であると信じています。4世紀と5世紀において哲学者であったヒッポのアウグスティヌスは「正戦論」について書きました。それ以来、多くの人々はアウグスティヌスの考えに基づいています。概要は以下です。


1. 戦争原因は正当であること。それゆえに攻撃目的ではなく、罪なき人々を守り、防御すること。

2. 適切な権限と責任を持つ者でなければ、戦争を正当に開始することはできない。もう一方の頬も向けなさいと、マタイ書の5章が対人関係について特に述べている。ローマの信徒への手紙13章によると、神様は上に立つ権威を定め、権威者が悪を行う者に怒りを持って報う。管轄下において宣言された時だけに戦争が正当化される。

3. 戦争を始める側の道徳的理念は相手側の道徳的理念を明らかに上回るべきである。両者共に神様は味方だと主張する上で、戦争を正当化するのならば戦争を始めた側はより正当な理由を明らかに証明するべきである。

4. 戦争は正しい意図によってのみ宣言される。その意図はジャストピース(公正に基づいた平和)を得る、もしくは回復のためである。罰することや恥をかかせるという欲求は正当化できる意図ではない。

5. 戦争は最終手段であること。平和のためにも、戦争を行う前に暴力に問わない全ての手段の執行に尽くすこと。

6. 戦争原因がどんなに正当であっても、戦争による成功の見込みがなければ戦争は正当化されない。勝つことができないのならば、戦うことは人生において不必要な消費となる。

7. 戦争は悲劇的に必然なものであり、攻撃の機会を狙うものではない。愛の原理によって動かされるものであり、熱心に戦争をするのではなく、必要に迫られ不本意ながら受け入れること。


 C・S・ルイスはオックスフォード大学とケンブリッジ大学で教鞭を取り、キリスト教の小説家でした。「正戦論」の考えの例について彼は読者に次のような状況について考えるように問いました。とある狂者が殺したいほど憎い相手を探している途中、C・S・ルイスを殴り倒します。この時、主がルイスに真に望むことは、立ち尽くし、男の殺人を見過ごすことでしょうか?ルイスの明確な答えは「ノー」です。


 その他の例では、戦争は時に必要であると考えるクリスチャンは、前世紀とアドルフ・ヒットラーを振り返って考えます。平和がナチス・ドイツと共にいることは可能だったのでしょうか?ヒットラーは平和を求めているかのようにみせながらも、ポーランドや他の国々を侵略しました。現代においても、物理的な力を決して使わないと約束してISIS(イラクとシリアで発生したイスラム過激派組織)や他の似通ったグループの問題に直面することは現実的でしょうか?「正戦」を必要に応じて行うべきことがあると考える人々にとって、聖書の「戦いの時、平和の時」が定められている(コヘレトの言葉3章)の意味がここにあると考えます。

 しかし、平和主義に問題が見られるように、他の人も「正戦論」の原理に異議を唱えるのです。一例を挙げると、上記の1と3において、戦争原因が正当であるかどうか誰が決めるのでしょうか?戦争に行く多くの人々、もしくは大部分か全員は、自分自身が正しいと考えます。神の教えや導きにおいて戦争に対する基底がないことにより、十字軍として戦ったクリスチャンや過激派イスラム教の聖戦(ジハード)実行者、その他の人々などの戦争を始めた人々は良い事、または必要な事を行っていると考えるでしょう。私たちの行いが間違っている場合でも、他人や自分を騙し、自分達の行いが正しいと考えることは容易です。


 私は以前このことについて話したかもしれません。私は次の事柄について個人的に感じるところがあります。多くの若者たちが戦地へ送られたように、もしかしたら国が私をベトナム戦争へ送りこむことがあるかもしれないと思いながら育ちました。拒否した者もいましたし、戦地へ行った者もいました。当時、私は今とは違った考えを持っていましたので、きっと戦地へ行ったと思います。そうなれば人を殺したかもしれませんし、殺されていたかもしれません。幸運なことに私が15歳のときに戦争が終わりました。『私達は誤ちを犯してしまった。重大な誤ちを』(第1ページ)。私達はベトナムに長くとどまった。戦争を始めたときはそれが正しく必要だと思えたが、後にそうではなくなった。戦時中にアメリカ国防長官だったロバート・マクナマラが本の中でこう書いているのを20年後に読んだときは衝撃的でした。他にも類似した例はあります。


 4では、戦争の動機は「ジャストピース(公正に基づいた平和)を得る、もしくは回復のためである」と言っています。しかし、戦争による最も恐ろしいことの多くは「終戦を早めるため」に行われたことです。原子爆弾が広島と長崎に落とされたのは、その衝撃と恐怖によって日本人が戦争への意志をなくし、特に終戦を早めるためでした。しかし、原爆投下による惨事を見れば、この行為の真意を「正当」や「平和の模索」とは非常に呼び難いです。


 クリスチャンで戦争を良いことだと考える人は少ないでしょう。しかし多くの人々は平和主義を単純であり、多くの人々を戦争へと導き、戦争をなくすことはない致命的な信念体系だと見ています。機会があれば人殺しを犯すような現実世界では、人の命を敬うために暴力を使って命を守る意志を必要とします。多くのクリスチャンは、平和主義では望むべき平和を維持することに失敗すると考えています。悪に対する抵抗は小さ過ぎます。最後には罪のない人々が結果的に苦しむこととなるでしょう。


 それでは平和への道はどこにあるのでしょうか?一方で神様は戦争を嫌い、人殺しは悪です。しかし、他方で多くの人にとって平和主義は単純であるなら、争と平和に関する問いへのもっとキリスト教的な答えをどのようにして見つけることはできるのでしょうか?戦争と平和への思いが私たちの肩にかかっている限り、常に平和を求め、決して戦争を望まないという任務を私たちはどのように遂行できるのでしょうか?


 「正戦論」という考えにより、多くの戦争を招くのではなく、平和へと一歩近づいたと指摘する人々もいます。例えば、ヨーロッパと他諸国の人々は何年もの間、戦争を行うことに対して国の主導者のみが責任を持つと信じていました。主導者は神に対して責任があり、大衆は主導者に仕える責任がありました。しかし、なぜ戦争が必要なのかという明確な説明を「正戦論」が求めたことにより、大衆の戦争の必要性についての疑問や戦争開始に反する動きへと導いたのです。第二次世界大戦後に行われたドイツの主導者のニュルンベルク裁判は、主導者だけではなく一般兵士へと責任が移った重要な段階でした。この過程で「正戦論」の原理は大きく関わりました。


 その他の実際の事例においても、「正戦論」から成る考えにより人々が戦争を反対することを容易にしました。これにより以下の事柄は「正戦論」の 説得力のある強い主張を可能にしました。(1)罪のない人々への危険が大きくない。(2)その他の方法を試していない。(3)勝算の可能性が大きくない。


 結局はキリスト教信仰に従う平和への道は福音にあります。私は罪の赦しのみを言っているのではありません。福音全てが私たちの生活の全部分を変えるのです。福音は教えだけではなく、私たちの 生き方であり、態度であり、精神なのです。もう一度、平和の福音について考えてみましょう。


 世界が始まったときから、主は私たちと神様の間に平和を望まれました。

人間が罪を犯したとき、平和は崩れ、人間関係の崩壊が殺人、そして戦争へと導いたのです。しかし神様は私たちを見放しませんでした。平和を愛する主導者、平和へと導く教え、主の平和を表す行為、神様は幾度も私たちにこれらを送ってくださいました。なぜなら主の私たちに対する深い愛があるからです。


 私たち人間は、このような贈り物により平和へと導かれることさえも拒みました。主は一人子をこの世へ送りました。イエス様は平安に生きることは何なのかを見せてくださいました。イエス様は剣を抜くのではく、軍事・政治・経済力を通しての偉大さを見せるのでありませんでした。主は完全に異なるタイプの力を見せてくださいました。主は自身を全く違う王国の王として示されました。神の国は何よりも崇高なものなのです。


 聖書は、イエス様が勝ち負けで正当が決まる場所、戦争から人々を遠ざけるよう説いています。その代わりに主は平和を愛する国民のコミュニティーを建てるために働きました(マタイによる福音書5:44-45)。


 しかし、わたしは言っておく。敵を愛し、自分を迫害する者のため に祈りなさい。あなたがたの天の父の子となるためである。父は悪 人にも善人にも太陽を昇らせ、正しい者にも正しくない者にも雨を 降らせてくださるからである。


 先ほど戦争している私たちの姿を見るよりも、神様は死ぬ方がよいと考えられると言いました。事実、神様はそのようになされました。イエス様は私たちの罪の代償として十字架にかけられました。そして私たちが再び神様と、お互いと共に平和を持つことができるようにしてくださいました。全ての聖書の話を通してずっと、そして最期の時でさえもイエス様が深く心配しているのは平和でした。ヨハネの黙示録の大きな展開においても、この世の終わりに神様は全ての国家、民族、異なる言語を使う神様に仕える人々が集まり、神様の家において平和に永遠に暮らすと示されています。


 それは、戦争と平和のパズルのピースを綺麗に並べることのように魔法の答えではありません。しかし、神様が私たちを呼び、私たちが神様に従うということは決まったことなのです。神様を真似ることでお互いに壁を作るのではなく架け橋を作る者になるようにと、神様は私たちに求めました。「だれとでも平和に暮らそうと考え、そのために全力を尽くしなさい」(詩篇34:14)。現代、そのための唯一の道を人々が探し出すことを主は期待しています。十字架にかけられた主の精神を私たちが示して欲しいと望んでいます。戦争へと導く猛威の前に立ち向かい、私たち自身を神様に委ねることにより、神様の作られた平和の世界観が現実となりえるのです。


 神様が始めにこの世を作られたときは平和がありました。再びイエス様が統治と平和の回復のために戻られることへの約束を褒め称えます。その時にはようやく人々が主と共に平和でありますように、その結果としてお互いと仲良く暮らしますように。私たちはその日を待ち望むのだけではなく、現状の平和へ働きかけるように主に求められています。イエス様の平和が戻られる時まで、共に祈り、働き、主によって強く生きましょう。そうすることで、様々な場所にいる人々が平和であるキリスト、それ故のキリストの平和を知る機会を得るでしょう。


 共に祈りましょう。


 主よ。主は私たちに教えてくださいました。私たちの主への責任は、人間、政府、文化、何よりも最も重要なことです。私たちを平和から遠ざけ、分裂・対立・戦争へと向かわせる圧力に私たちが屈服しないために救ってください。神は一人子であるイエス様を平和の王子として統治するために送ってくださいました。どうかイエス様により私たちの心、思考、そして全世界が導かれますように。イエスキリストの御名によってお祈りいたします。アーメン。


参考書


Grimsrud, T. (n.d.) “Peace Theology: A Christian Pacifist Perspective on War and Peace.” Retrieved August 11, 2015 from http://peacetheology.net/ pacifism/2-a-christian-pacifist-perspective-on-war-and-peace/

Lewis, C. S. (1941). “Why I’m Not a Pacifist.” The Weight of Glory. San Francisco: HarperOne.

McNamara, R. (1996). In Retrospect: The Tragedy and Lessons of Vietnam. 1st Edition. New York: Vintage Books.

Moore, T. C. (n.d.) “Why C. S. Lewis Was Wrong About Pacifism.” TanksToTractors.org. Retrieved August 11, 2015 from http://www. academia.edu/410218/Why_C._S._Lewis_Was_Wrong_About_Pacifism

Southern Baptist Convention, The. (2000). The Baptist Faith and Message. Retrieved August 11, 2015 from http://www.sbc.net/bfm2000/bfm2000. asp

Wittman, C. (May 09, 2009). “Peace and War.” Baptist Faith and Message Sermon 18. Retrieved August 10, 2015 from http://www.lifeway.com/ Article/Foundations-faith-peace-and-war